As an industry professional, you're eligible to receive a printed copy of the journal.

Fill out your address below.






Please reset your password to access the new DRJ.com
Reset my password
Welcome aboard, !
You're all set. We've send you an email confirmation to
just to confirm you're you.

Welcome to DRJ

Already registered user? Please login here

Existing Users Log In
   

Create new account
(it's completely free). Subscribe

There are many different components to your BCM program, including your business impact analysis (BIA), recovery plans, exercises, training, and metrics. Some components are from critical business units that require recovery right away while others can be deferred for an extended period. In light of the great depth and breadth of the BCM landscape, the question arises: Where should your BCM office focus its time and resources to ensure the highest potential for recoverability in the event of a disruption? More specifically, should the focus be on the front end (BIA, risk assessment), the middle (strategies and plans), or the…

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Michael Herrera

Michael Herrera is the CEO of MHA Consulting, a leading business continuity planning and information technology consulting firm. Herrera is the founder of BCMMetrics, which specializes in business continuity software designed to aid organizations in developing and executing business continuity programs.

The Evolution of Vendor Management
Thirty years ago, as a new business continuity coordinator, I discovered that preventing bad things from happening was not always...
READ MORE
Career Spotlight – Susan Brown
EDITOR’S NOTE: The DRJ Career Development Committee is supporting this series of articles featuring the career paths of industry professionals....
READ MORE
Ask the Executive: An Interview with Rob van den Eijnden of Royal Philips
Rob van den Eijnden, MBCI, CISA, CRISC, Lead Auditor ISO 22301, is the global business continuity and resilience leader for...
READ MORE
Build Consistency to Ensure Quality

Service consistency and quality is an expectation of all stakeholders at all times. The people depending on you want peace of mind and no unpleasant surprises. Providing consistent services implies achieving sameness, uniformity, and fairness in the delivery or execution of all service attributes, regardless of time, place, occasion, and provider. The lack of consistent service by the business continuity management (BCM) team is one of the main reasons management and stakeholders get a sour taste in their mouth about business continuity. BCM practitioners must strive to provide a service environment that makes its stakeholders happy and supportive of the need for business continuity.

Develop a Catalog of Services

The first step in providing consistent, quality service is for your office to decide which services it provides and which it doesn’t. Have you identified and cataloged the services your team offers? The following services are among those commonly provided by enterprise BCM offices:

READ MORE