In July, 45 high-profile Twitter accounts tweeted variations of the same offer: Send me any amount of Bitcoin, and I’ll send you back double its value. The messages were sent by hackers who had used stolen credentials from a Twitter employee’s account to gain access to powerful internal administrative tools. They then used that access to take over 130 Twitter accounts. For hours, Twitter’s security team worked to regain control of the accounts and delete the fraudulent tweets. Unfortunately, hundreds of Twitter users were defrauded. By the time the ringleaders were arrested weeks later, they had amassed more than $180,000…
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